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10 posts categorized "Fausto Zamora"

04/03/2013

CIEE ALCALÁ-SPRING 2013. LILLY MOABA (KENYON COLLEGE)- FAUSTO Y CRISTINA

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¿Quiénes son Cristina y Fausto? Se puede decir que Cristina y Fausto son los directores de CIEE para nuestro grupo en Alcalá de Henares, pero creo que son más. Además de ser nuestros profesores y mentores durante nuestro tiempo en Alcalá, funcionan como nuestros terceros padres (¡qué suerte que tenemos padres de verdad, de España y ellos!) El día que llegamos Cristina estaba esperando en el aeropuerto con un anuncio de CIEE hasta que todo el grupo llegó a Madrid. Su sonrisa grande y su cariñosa manera de ser me calmó inmediatamente. Antes de conocer a nuestras familias, pasamos dos días de orientación en los cuales aprendimos un poco sobre la cultura y las normas de España, la seguridad y el Instituto en donde estudiaríamos. También, ella es nuestra profesora de la clase de gramática en el Instituto y su oficina siempre está abierta para discutir o charlar sobre cualquiera duda o problema. Fausto es nuestro tutor y líder de los viajes. Cada semana, tenemos la oportunidad de una tutoría si necesitamos ayuda con una clase o simplemente queremos más práctica para hablar. Durante la orientación, él nos introdujo las ciudades de Alcalá y Madrid. También, tenemos dos viajes con CIEE durante el semestre. El primer viaje fuimos a Extremadura y Fausto nos enseñó mucho sobre las historias de las tres ciudades que visitamos: Cáceres, Mérida y Trujillo. Mi parte favorita fue ver el teatro, el anfiteatro y el acueducto de los Milagros en Mérida que había estudiado en Historia de Arte en el Instituto. El segundo viaje fuimos a León, Rueda y Las Cuevas del Valporquero. Vimos las vidrieras magníficas de la Catedral de León, probamos vino blanco muy rico de la región de Rueda y exploramos cuevas subterráneas con estalagmitas increíbles.

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Who are Cristina and Fausto? One could say that Cristina and Fausto are the CIEE directors for our group in Alcalá de Henares, but I think they are more. Other than being our professors and mentors during our time in Alcalá, they function as our third parents (how lucky we are to have real parents, Spanish parents, and them!) The day we arrived Cristina was waiting in the airport with a CIEE sign until everyone in our group arrived in Madrid. Her big smile and caring demeanor immediately calmed my nerves. Before meeting our families, we spent two days of orientation in which we learned a little bit about Spanish culture and norms, safety, and the Institute where we would be studying. Also, she is our Grammar professor at the Institute and her office is always open to discuss any doubt or problem. Fausto is our tutor and trip leader. Every week, CIEE students have the opportunity for a tutor session if we need help with a class or simply want more practice talking. During orientation, he introduced us to the cities of Alcalá and Madrid. Also, we have two trips with CIEE throughout the semester. The first trip we went to Extremadura and Fausto taught us a lot about the histories of the three cities we visited: Cáceres, Mérida, and Trujillo. My favorite part was seeing the theater, amphitheater, and Miraculous Aqueduct in Mérida that I studied in Art History at the Institute. The second trip we went to León, Rueda, and The Caves of Valporquero. We saw the magnificent stained-glass windows of the León Cathedral, tasted delicious white wine in the region of Rueda, and explored subterranean caves with incredible stalagmites. 550052_454717414596811_883051026_n 473_454734447928441_216977233_n

02/18/2013

2ND. CIEE ALCALÁ (SPAIN) SPRING 2013 NEWS LETTER.

Meeting with Spanish students from the University is always a highlight of our first week. January 16 was the “Spanish-CIEE students get-together” in the Cervecería EL PORTÓN. 7 Spaniards had our 9 students all to themselves, to talk, have something to drink, make plans to meet up another day, etc.  

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Our first CIEE meeting in February 6th, to talk about adapting to Alcalá and Culture Shock, was very interesting because we were able to see how the students feel and their differences that they have had when facing new experiences.

        Reunión 1 de CIEE  (1)

February started off in the Instituto Benjamin Franklin with the Friday visits and excursions: Segovia, El Escorial y Valle de Los Caídos, Cervantes House, Soccer Stadium “Vicente Calderón”, Naval Museum of Madrid, Barrio de las Letras… But also they had their personal excursions and field trips.

  Amanda en la Alhambra 2

Abby, Lily y Molly Segovia
Sean en la nieve

 

The relationships with their families are very good. Our students are one more member.

  Becca y su familia

  Lily y sus hermanas

 February was also carnival month in Spain. Some students wore costumes to celebrate.

           Carnaval 1

February 15-17th the CIEE group went to Extremadura (Cáceres, Mérida y Trujillo). We had a great time and it gave the students a chance to relax a bit two weekends before midterm exams.

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10/04/2012

CIEE Alcalá- Fall 2012- Fausto Zamora: La Rioja red wine.

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Next month Fall 2012 CIEE students and Staff are going to visit LA RIOJA. So, I want to give you some clues related to La Rioja wine.

Boella de vino roda

La Rioja is a small area, but is the richest in production of table wines in Spain and has gained a world-wide reputation in the past few years. It is divided into sub-areas: Rioja Baja, Rioja Alta and Rioja Alavesa.

Botella de vino 2

  • Rioja Baja produces fruity, full-bodied wines of higher alcoholic content than the other two areas.

      Botellas de vino 3

  • Rioja Alta is the area known for one-year old red wines, calledañadas and for reservas, which are wines aged for at least two years in a barrel, plus one year in bottles. These are highly aromatic wines, balanced and with a flavor that cannot be mistaken. White wines, best drank young are also produced in this area.

      Botella vino 1

  • Rioja Alavesa is an area that produces young red wines.

Copa de vino 2

Special Reserves

As we mentioned, this area produces some truly high quality wines, called special reserves. They come in three categories, depending on the length of time that they have been left to mature:

Crianza

Wines are aged for a period of at least one year in a barrel, then stored in bottles for one more year. As a rule, Crianzas are made from grapes of the third, fourth or fifth crop.

Reserva

These wines are aged for at least two years in the barrel, then one additional year in the bottle.

Gran Reserva

Aged for at least three years in oak barrels, then one year in bottles in the underground cellars famous in La Rioja, called calaos.

Corchos botellas

There's a social tolerance for wine  consumption and the atmosphere in which drinking is done - in bars, restaurants, with friends and family - is usually relaxed and more suited to slower drinking than in some other countries. It is rare to see alcohol-fuelled violence. You only have to go out at night in Alcalá to see that, generally, wine is well under control.


10/01/2012

Cassandra Tumolo (Villanova University)-CIEE Alcalá-Fall 2012: Fausto y Cristina

Before coming to Spain, I had no idea what to expect; there were so many emotions and thoughts that were running through my mind. What if I won’t be able to survive because of the language? What if my host family doesn’t like me? What if my group thinks I am weird? Questions like this were running through my head the entire summer. However, one of my biggest worries was: what about my directors? Who are they? What are they like? Will they help us or drop us off a cliff to survive on our own?     

  López 1

After arriving in Madrid and sitting in the airport with another student, I was definitely antsy to find out who Cristina is. Yes I saw pictures and heard her voice during our online orientation over the summer, but regardless, I kept asking myself, who is Cristina? When I met Cristina in the airport holding a CIEE sign with a smile on her face from ear to ear, she greeted me with a huge hug; not too long after our other director, Fausto, joined us. Both Fausto and Cristina eased us all in to make sure we were comfortable and happy. From that point on, all of my doubts as to who our directors are went away. Cristina and Fausto are nice, funny, fun, and are great directors! They make you feel comfortable and help build your confidence. They are always there for help whenever you need it and it is always done with a smile on their face. In other words, they are like the papa and mama bird of this 11 person family we created.  I am so thankful for such great directors who I know will be so helpful during our time here abroad.

  López 2

Antes de venir a España, no tenía ni idea de qué esperar, había tantas emociones y pensamientos que corrían por mi mente. ¿Y si no puedo sobrevivir con la lengua? ¿Y si mi grupo piensa que soy rara? Preguntas como estas estuvieron en mi mente todo el verano. Sin embargo, una preocupación fundamental era: ¿Cómo son mis directores? ¿Quiénes son? ¿Qué son? ¿Nos ayudan o nos dejan en un acantilado para sobrevivir con nuestros propios medios, por nosotros mismos? 

  López 3

Después de llegar a Madrid y sentarme en el aeropuerto con otro estudiante, yo estaba ansiosa y busqué a Cristina. Sí, yo vi las fotos y escuché su voz durante nuestra orientación en línea, pero yo continuamente  me preguntaba: ¿Quién es Cristina? Cuando conocí a Cristina en el aeropuerto con un cartel CIEE con una sonrisa en su cara de oreja a oreja, ella me saludó con un abrazo enorme, y no mucho tiempo después nuestro otro director, Fausto, se unió a nosotros.

López 4

Fausto y Cristina nos han facilitado la transición en España.  Como resultado, nosotros estábamos contentos y cómodos.  ¡Cristina y Fausto son agradables, divertidos y unos directores increíbles! Te hacen sentirte cómodo y ayudan a construir tu confianza con la lengua. Ellos siempre están allí para ayudarnos cuando lo necesitamos y siempre tienen una sonrisa en la cara. En otras palabras, Cristina y Fausto son como el pájaro papá y mamá de esta familia de once personas que hemos creado. Estoy agradecida por los maravillosos directores que conozco, siempre estarán allí para el grupo durante nuestro semestre en el extranjero.

 

02/28/2012

Fausto Zamora-CIEE Alcalá: "torrijas" (Eastern dessert)

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Torrijas (bread pudding)

You should definitely try torrijas at Easter. They are eaten all over Spain and consist of slices of bread soaked in milk, sugar and egg, fried in olive oil. According to what they are dipped in, and the way they are presented, there are other, delicious varieties: with wine, syrup, honey or sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon.

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Ingredients

  •  Milk
  • Olive oil
  • Honey
  • Sugar
  • Eggs
  • Slices of bread for 'torrijas'
  • Cinnamon.

Preparation

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Cut a large loaf of bread for 'torrijas' in fairly thick slices (you can also use special ready sliced bread). Mix the milk, the cinnamon and sugar in a deep bowl. Beat the eggs in a separate dish. Dip the slices of bread in the sugared milk and eggs and fry in a pan with boiling oil until golden brown. You have to fry the mixture of bread, milk and egg with medium heat. It has to be fry outside and inside, but don’t has to be crunchy. Then drain well.

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Some people use red wine in this point instead milk, the arecalled "torrijas borrachas" (drunk torrijas).

Place the 'torrijas' on a serving dish and pour honey and cinnamon over them. It is also traditional to add the sugared milk to the serving dish so that the 'torrijas' soak it up and become more spongy. 


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Some people finish their torrijas after frying with just sprinkling them with sugar as I said, but .I like to make a syrup and bathe our torrijas in it, to make them juicer.

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The syrup is made with water, sugar and lemon juice and one stick of cinnamon.

Boil the water with sugar, juice from a lemon, and one lemon skin.

Add the cinnamon stick if you like.

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12/12/2011

Fausto Zamora (Fall 2011)-CIEE Alcalá: taken form the pig, even the way they walk.

Taken from the pig, even the way they walk.

Cerdos vivos
Cerdo ibérico
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Many foreigners are shocked when they learn about the variety of meat products coming from pigs that is consumed in Spain. To the omnipresent ham leg, with its diverse varieties, and prices that then determine its quality, we shouldn’t add only stuffed sausages – chorizo, spiced sausages, pork sausage, blood sausage, cured pork loin, and other types of sausage that don’t even have en English translation (morcones, chistorras, butifarras), etc. – but also all parts of the pig –the face, ears, pork bacon, the tail, ribs, spine – that tend to be the traditional accompaniment of the typical bean dishes – lentils, green beans and chick peas – and stews. Whereas other cultures only have two or three names to refer to this tasty meat –sausage, ribs, pork or fillets – the Spaniards go above and beyond with dozens and dozens of words, whether in Castilian Spanish, Catalan, Basque or Galician.

Cochinillo-asado1
Costillas en barbacoa

To understand why there is so much variety, we must keep in mid that up until the 1960s, Spain was mainly a rural country, with developing roads and where families had to feed a couple of pigs which, after the slaughter, would give all of the products previously mentioned, whether it be for their own consumption or to sell.

Chorizo y morcilla

The slaughter, currently on the route of becoming extinct and in some regions of the country it is declared cultural interest, came about to put an end to the life of the pig (or one of the many Spanish names: cerdo, gocho, marrano, cochino, puerco, guarro, etc.) that took place only after the first cold days of Fall, since the sacrifice of the animal required very cold days without humidity from the rain. The calendar of the saints precisely marked the date, the day of Saint Martin , November 11th. “To every pig arrives his Saint Martin”, (“A todo guarro le llega su San Martín”,) an expression that means that anything (or anyone) that does something bad ends up paying for it or will be punished. “For Saint Andrew, kill your animal,” (“Por San Andrés, mata tu res”) November 30th, came to be the exit flag. The neighbors gathered together early in the morning. The men were the ones in charge of taking the animal out of the swineherd, into the farmyard, and holding it down tight so that the most skillful person (man or woman) would slit its throat and, after burning its skin and getting rid the hair with aromatic herbs, opening up a clean canal to the intestines, as to not ruin the meat. The women were the ones in charge of collecting the blood while the animal was still alive, mixing it to prevent clotting and then immediately after mixing it with fat –lard from other slaughters- spices and onions, to stuff it all into previously treated and dried intestines. Once the mixture was stuffed in the guts, it was cooked in plenty of water and the blood sausages were all ready.

Cortes_cerdo

Once the animal was skinned and bled, the next step was to cut it into pieces, thighs (2), shoulders (2) and that way each piece was used appropriately to make chorizo sausages and other stuffed sausages or to be cured (salting or smoked). As you can see, there is a lot of work and collaboration that goes into this. The slaughter was the best social interaction therapy, in most recent terms, “with the help of a neighbor, my father killed the pig” (“con la ayuda de un vecino, mató mi padre el gorrino”).

MORCON IBERICO_

Butifarra cruda

In addition, and also to better understand the close connection that Spain has with this totemic animal, I must say that, even if only slightly, eating pork assumed a kind of religious test. Knowing that in the Iberian Peninsula, with Spain being made up of Castile and Aragon in the 15th century, the coexistence of Christianity, Hebrew and Islam had begun to collapse. The Jews were obligated to convert to Christianity (conversos) or leave Spain. Centuries later, the same would happen to the Muslims (moriscos). For the ones who stayed, buying pork, raising pigs and eating it was a much more reliable proof of their conversion to Christianity than going to Catholic mass or to a religious procession during the Catholic holidays. The Inquisition did not have the slightest doubt of rejecting those accusations when there was proof of such practices as the authentic Christian eating pork.

Panceta

To conclude, Babe could have done little or nothing to lessen the love that we Spaniards have for this animal and its meat.

  Tesis Ernesto y CLub lectura Fall 08 009

 

10/27/2011

Eating on All Saints’ day (November 1st) in Alcalá- Spain- Fall 2011

Eating on All Saints’ day (November 1st) in Alcalá- Fausto Zamora

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To make the day a bit less bitter, we must not forget that we remember all the deceased, the popular wisdom generated the custom of eating special foods.

I will mention the sweets, because I have a sweet tooth, but diabetics or “top models” should refrain from trying them! If you peek into the window of Salinas pastry shop in the Plaza de Cervantes, you’ll be able to see some of them and I’m sure you’ll want to go in and taste them.

 

  Saints’ bones. (Huesos de santo)

   Huesos-de-santo2

If there’s one typical sweet for All Saints’ Day, it’s the “saints’ bones”. Made with a marzipan dough, these sweets are covered with a syrup and have different fillings. They are shaped like bones, which is where its name comes from. The saints’ bones make up part of the pastry and baked goods in Castile and Spain in general, and it’s very common to eat them across the peninsula on November 1st.

 

 Wind Fritters (Buñuelos o buñuelos de viento)

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Though they are perhaps more well-known toe at during “Holy Week”, these fritters are also eaten for All Saints’ Day. They’re very simple to make, and the recipe basically consists in a dough made with flour, sugar and a filling that could be one of many flavors. The fritters are cheaper and lighter than the Saints’ bones, and their roots go back to the “Deep Castile”.

 

  Quince Jelly (Dulce de membrillo)

  Membrillo_M Dulce_de_membrillo
 

This is a very fall treat because it’s during this time when the fruit is harvested from the Quince tree and a type of jelly or compote is made in the home. Careful, though: quince can’t be eaten raw. The jelly is made simply by boiling the pulp of the quince with the same amount of sugar, resulting in a block of jelly that can be cut to go with or fill different types of culinary dishes.

 

“Pestiños” (There is no English translation!)

Pestiños

  

It’s tradition to eat them at this time of year. They’re pretty easy to make, since there are only three main ingredients: flour, olive oil and sugar, but the key is in frying the dough, and that’s another story. There are lots of variations of the recipe, sometimes adding lemon, honey or Jerez wine.

 

  Roasted chestnuts (Castañas asadas)

Castañas-asadas

 

Since All Saints’ Day is celebrated in fall, it isn’t strange that one of the most typical nuts is eaten to celebrate it: chestnuts. When they’re roasted they are very tasty, and can be easily eaten. The most common way to roast them is over a hot griddle, though they can also be roasted in the fireplace, in a bonfire or even in the oven.

 

 

 

 

 

10/17/2011

Spanish Music-Música Española (CIEE Alcalá- Fausto Zamora-Fall 2011)

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Spanish music (Fausto Zamora)


Even though your age has a lot to do with your musical preferences, and my age is pretty far from our beloved CIEE Alcalá students, I’d like to dedicate this post to give you some ideas on how to improve your listening skills in Spanish with music from here, from now and then, from Spain. I know that you know Juanes, Shakira, Luis Miguel and some other Hispanic artists, but I want to give you the change to have some other Spanish singers and groups in mind.


With music you can also learn fixed expressions, vocabulary that you can’t find in the books, different ways of pronunciation depending on the geographical zone, etc.


Examples of Groups and Artists
Alejandro Sanz, Alex Ubago , Amaia Montero, Amaral, Celtas Cortos, Concha Buika, Concha Piquer,David Bisbal , Diego el Cigala , El Arrebato, El Canto del Loco, El Sueño de Morfeo, Enrique Iglesias,Enrique Bunbury, Estopa, Gabinete Caligari, Joaquín Sabina, La Oreja de Van Gogh, Malú, Mecano, Melendi ,Nena Daconte, Rosario Flores, Vetusta Morla,…
 
Steps
•       First, you should choose one of the names given above.
•       Then, and before listening to anything, look up the musical biography of the group or soloist (that way you can practice the past tenses and vocabulary, improving your reading comprehension).
•       Then, choose a random song.
•       Listen to the song. If you don’t like the style, don’t worry. It’s more about practicing Spanish, not about dancing and singing the rhythm of the music.
•       Then listen a second time, trying to write as many works or phrases that you can understand.
•       Finally, look up the lyrics of the song on the internet. Don’t trust them, some of them are poor transcriptions, so listen again to check that what you’re reading and listening to are the same thing.
•       If there are any differences, correct them.

Now you’re ready to sing…but since you know that my input in this blog is culture and more specifically, Spanish food and gastronomy, I don’t want to miss the chance to send you the best song ever to talk about some of the traditional Spanish dishes.
It’s by the group “Vainica Doble” (a Spanish music pop duo, made up of Carmen Santonja and Gloria Van Aerssen, who worked together since 1969—you guys weren’t even born yet and maybe even some of your parents weren’t born—but Carmen Santoja died in 2000 and the other didn’t continue singing). You can hear it at:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCxFbGXtQF0:
 

(Lyrics in Spanish)
Siempre que vuelves a casa
me pillas en la cocina
embadurnada de harina
con las manos en la masa

-Niña, no quiero platos finos
vengo del trabajo
y no me apetece pato chino
a ver si me aliñas
un gazpacho con su ajo y su pepino

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

-Chiquillo, que yo hice un cursillo
para ‘Cordon Bleu’
-Eso ya lo sé, pero chiquilla...
-...¿Qué?
-Dame pepinillos, y yo los remojaré
con una copita de Ojén

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

Vocabulary:
Pillar: to catch (someone)
Embadurnado: covered in (something)
Harina: flour
Masa: dough
Pato: duck
Aliñar: to season
Cochifrito: fried lamb or goat meat dish
Caldereta: stew made with potato, onion, oil, wine and some type of meat or seafood
Migas: typical dish made with bread crumbs, olive oil, grapes and pork
Cebolleta: scallion
Morteruelo: stew with pork liver
lacón con grelos: Boiled shoulder of pork with turnip tops
Bacalao al pil pil: Codfish in pil pil sauce (garlic and pepper sauce)
Perejil: Parsley
Remojar: to soak



 

 



La música española (Fausto Zamora)


Aunque en cuestión de música la edad que tienes te condiciona, y la mía dista bastante de la de nuestros queridos estudiantes de CIEE Alcalá, quiero utilizar este post para daros ideas de cómo mejorar vuestra capacidad auditiva en español con música de aquí, de ahora y de antes, de España. Sé que conocéis a Juanes, a Shakira, a Luis Miguel y a algunos hispanos más, pero quiero daros la oportunidad de tener en mente otros nombres de cantantes y grupos españoles.
Con la música además puedes aprender expresiones fijas, vocabulario que no está en los libros, formas de pronunciar diferentes dependiendo de las zonas geográficas,…

 

Procedimiento

 *   Primero, debéis escoger uno de los nombres que se os propone,
 *   a continuación y antes de escuchar nada, buscad la biografía musical del grupo o solista (así practicas pasados y vocabulario, mejorando tu comprensión lectora),
 *   más tarde elegid una canción al azar,
 *   la escucháis, si no os gusta el estilo, no os preocupéis, de lo que se trata es de practicar español, no de bailar y cantar al ritmo de la música.
 *   Más tarde haced una segunda audición intentando escribir el mayor número de palabras o frases que entendáis.
 *   Finalmente buscad la letra de la canción en internet, no os fiéis de ella, algunas veces están mal transcritas, así que escuchad nuevamente y comprobad que lo que leéis y oís coincide,
 *   si no es así, corregidlo.


Ahora estáis listos para cantar… pero como sabéis que lo mío en este blog es la cultura y muy concretamente la comida y la cocina, no quiero perder esta oportunidad para mandaros la mejor canción de todos los tiempos para hablar de algunos de los platos tradicionales españoles.


Es del grupo  “Vainica Doble” (un dúo español de música pop formado por Carmen Santonja Carmen Santonja y Gloria Van Aerssen que trabajó desde 1969 –aún no habíais nacido y muchos de vuestros padres tampoco, pero en 2000 murió la primera y la otra no siguió cantando) y podéis escucharla en

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCxFbGXtQF0:

Siempre que vuelves a casa
me pillas en la cocina
embadurnada de harina
con las manos en la masa

-Niña, no quiero platos finos
vengo del trabajo
y no me apetece pato chino
a ver si me aliñas
un gazpacho con su ajo y su pepino

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

-Chiquillo, que yo hice un cursillo
para `Cordon Bleu`
-Eso ya lo sé, pero chiquilla...
-...¿Qué?
-Dame pepinillos, y yo los remojaré
con una copita de Ojén

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

 

 

 

 

 

La música española (Fausto Zamora)

Aunque en cuestión de música la edad que tienes te condiciona, y la mía dista bastante de la de nuestros queridos estudiantes de CIEE Alcalá, quiero utilizar este post para daros ideas de cómo mejorar vuestra capacidad auditiva en español con música de aquí, de ahora y de antes, de España. Sé que conocéis a Juanes, a Shakira, a Luis Miguel y a algunos hispanos más, pero quiero daros la oportunidad de tener en mente otros nombres de cantantes y grupos españoles.

Con la música además puedes aprender expresiones fijas, vocabulario que no está en los libros, formas de pronunciar diferentes dependiendo de las zonas geográficas,…

Ejemplos de Grupos/Artistas

Alejandro Sanz, Alex Ubago , Amaia Montero, Amaral, Celtas Cortos, Concha Buika, Concha Piquer, David Bisbal , Diego el Cigala , El Arrebato, El Canto del Loco, El Sueño de Morfeo, Enrique Iglesias, Enrique Bunbury, Estopa, Gabinete Caligari, Joaquín Sabina, La Oreja de Van Gogh, Malú, Mecano, Melendi , Nena Daconte, Rosario Flores, Vetusta Morla,…

 

Procedimiento

  • Primero, debéis escoger uno de los nombres que se os propone,
  • a continuación y antes de escuchar nada, buscad la biografía musical del grupo o solista (así practicas pasados y vocabulario, mejorando tu comprensión lectora),
  • más tarde elegid una canción al azar,
  • la escucháis, si no os gusta el estilo, no os preocupéis, de lo que se trata es de practicar español, no de bailar y cantar al ritmo de la música.
  • Más tarde haced una segunda audición intentando escribir el mayor número de palabras o frases que entendáis.
  • Finalmente buscad la letra de la canción en internet, no os fiéis de ella, algunas veces están mal transcritas, así que escuchad nuevamente y comprobad que lo que leéis y oís coincide,
  • si no es así, corregidlo.

 

 

Ahora estáis listos para cantar… pero como sabéis que lo mío en este blog es la cultura y muy concretamente la comida y la cocina, no quiero perder esta oportunidad para mandaros la mejor canción de todos los tiempos para hablar de algunos de los platos tradicionales españoles.

 

 

Es del grupo  “Vainica Doble” (un dúo español de música pop formado por Carmen Santonja y Gloria Van Aerssen que trabajó desde 1969 –aún no habíais nacido y muchos de vuestros padres tampoco, pero en 2000 murió la primera y la otra no siguió cantando) y podéis escucharla en http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCxFbGXtQF0:

 

Siempre que vuelves a casa
me pillas en la cocina
embadurnada de harina
con las manos en la masa


-Niña, no quiero platos finos
vengo del trabajo
y no me apetece pato chino
a ver si me aliñas
un gazpacho con su ajo y su pepino

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

-Chiquillo, que yo hice un cursillo
para `Cordon Bleu`
-Eso ya lo sé, pero chiquilla...
-...¿Qué?
-Dame pepinillos, y yo los remojaré
con una copita de Ojén

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil

Papas con arroz, bonito con tomate
cochifrito, caldereta,
migas con chocolate,
cebolleta en vinagreta,
morteruelo, lacón con grelos,
bacalao al pil pil...
...y un poquito perejil 

 

09/29/2011

¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡NOS GUSTA COMER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! CIEE ALCALÁ.

FAUSTO ZAMORA-FALL 2011 Fausto

 

We like to eat

Spain can be a Paradise, if you like to eat. But, don’t limit your ideas of Spanish food to just tapas, sangria, or paella. In addition to tapas or small plates of food, there are very good Spanish dishes that have nothing to do with tapas. Each region has its own typical dish and there are large differences between the north and the south, the interior and the coastal regions.

P1150866

Do Spaniards eat a lot of “tortilla” (potato and egg omelet)? Well yes, at home and you can get it in 85% of the bars, as long as it’s a bar with Spanish food (not a Chinese or Italian restaurant, or a cocktail bar). Sometimes it’s made with onion in addition to potatoes. “Tortilla” is one of the basic dishes in any Spanish mother’s kitchen, and the best tortilla is always your mom’s. It’s very tasty and you should try a lot of them to compare them. Tortilla isn’t something that you eat every day or with every meal, but pretty often.

Tortilla y ensalada

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tortilla de patata

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does everyone in Spain eat paella? Of course not. But, almost all Spaniards like it. It’s very hard to prepare a good paella. A foreigner may think of many different things when they think of paella, but in reality, it’s another of the many rice dishes.

P4020029

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do all Spaniards drink sangria? No, Spaniards sometimes drink sangria, mainly in the summer, but not everyone. The most popular drinks during mealtimes are wine, beer, and water.

  Limonada de león

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is Spanish food the same as tapas? No, of course not. The idea of free tapas depends on the bar: In some bars you can order a drink or another drink and basically eat for free. There are hundreds of different tapas.

    Huevos fritos La casera, vino y tapas


Are Spanish beers very small in the traditional bars? The “cañas” are small, if you compare them with English pints, for example. But it’s the best way to drink them in the summer when it’s very hot out. Imagine enjoying a few pints of strong beer when it’s 110º or mixing Guinness with seafood…bad idea. We have beers that mix well with our foods and that are served in moderate proportions.

 P1040652

  Tesis Ernesto y CLub lectura Fall 08 009


I’ve given the most well-known products for foreigners, but take a look at these pictures and you’ll see some of the other foods that we eat here.

Thank you for reading! I threaten to put up easy cooking recipes.

 

03/08/2011

Gastronomy from Ash Wednesday until Easter

Even though the days during “Semana Santa”, or Spain’s Holy Week, are religious days filled with processions and devotion, this time is also for celebration and family gatherings, and where gastronomy undoubtedly plays a main role.

 After Carnival, the next Catholic Holiday is Holy Week, days in which the Passion and Death of Christ are commemorated. The beatitude and spirituality combined with the people’s fervor of those who participate in the processions, church masses, and devotional songs. But the holidays also bring with them vacation and family visits, and so, a good kitchen table is necessary these days.

 Fish and typical pastries are the main typical gastronomical protagonists of this week. Catholic Lent does not allow you to eat meat on Fridays starting from the end of Carnival (Ash Wednesday), a Christian duty known as “vigil”, a culinary tradition that continues up until Good Friday.

  Potaje-espinacas

Codfish, garbanzo beans and spinach are the main ingredients in the traditional “vigilia” stew.

 

Codfish, fundamental fish in “vigilia” stew

Fritters, croquettes and omelet’s, all made with codfish, are three of the most typical dishes during this time. For each of them, the flour dough is mixed with the unmistakable flavor of codfish, which is the most common fish eaten during Holy Week. There are also those who opt to try the “pil pil”, one of the most traditional Spanish stews, covered in breadcrumbs and fried in the skillet.

  Buuelos de bacalao

 

Other Options
Catholic Holy Week has a lot of similarities with Jewish Passover, mainly in that, by means of penance, you must fast or abstain from eating meat during Lent and especially on Good Friday. Though many families no longer strictly follow these religious traditions, the customs are a very good excuse to offer to your family or friends typical recipes, ancient and elaborate flavors, which are increasingly less common in homes due to the fast-paced lifestyle we live.

 Sweets and Pastries

Baking is another strong point during Holy Week. All of the homemade pastries made with milk cover the tablecloths in everyone’s home during this time. The Spanish rice pudding and fried milk (a type of custard) are two of the most typical dishes.

  Arroz-con-leche

Leche-frita

In many pastry shops, mostly in Castile and Andalusia, the doughnuts of Holy Week fill the display windows, while in Levante, mainly in Catalonia, the most common are “Monas de Pascua”. 

  Mona_de_pasqua_tradicional

 

Las torrijas and los pestiños are the most popular pastries. Pestiños, from Castile, are made with a fried flour dough, sweetened with lots of honey. The torrijas, originally from Madrid and made with milk and wine, are essential for any Spanish palate during Easter. They’re easy to make, have a delicious flavor and don’t cost much, which is why they’ve become the perfect dish for these days of austerity. 

Torrijas
Pestiños